I’ve not had a lot of time to play with it since last night, so these are essentially knee-jerk reactions. Executive summary – I don’t like it, and I’ve gone back to using 0.38.2. Thankfully that wasn’t uninstalled when I installed 1.0.

The first time you run Tweetdeck 1.0, you are presented with a login screen. Not a twitter login screen, though. A Tweetdeck login screen. You need a Tweetdeck account to use Tweetdeck. Why? If you don’t have one, you have to create a Tweetdeck account before you can use Tweetdeck to access your Twitter account. And this is the official desktop Twitter client from Twitter, now? This makes no sense to me. Isn’t this just adding barriers to use?

Once you get past that hurdle, you are presented with the new style Twitter interface, matching the twitter.com interface and that of the new mobile apps. It looks quite nice, but there’s one glaring problem – no narrow columns. In the old tweetdeck I can easily fit 5 columns across my screen. In the new Tweetdeck I can fit only three. Lots of columns is the main reason I use Tweetdeck. Without that, there’s little point.

That last reason was good enough to send me back to old Tweetdeck so there may well be good things hiding in the new one that I haven’t found yet, and will not find until narrow columns come back. Somebody tell me when, or if, that happens…

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Over the last month or two I’ve seen several discussions about how to decide who to follow and who not to, and to my mind they all make the process much more complicated than it needs to be. Now I realise different people use Twitter differently and want to get different things from it, and that what I do may not work for others, so feel free to ignore this, or at least add contradictory views in the comments…

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On Twitter and Google+ I follow and am followed by people from different communities. There are personal friends, people from my workplace, people from my field of work, and others. When I engage in conversations on Twitter those conversations tend to stay within a particular community of users because the tweets are not visible to others. Google+ is different…

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People occasionally tell me they don’t understand twitter, and in particular don’t see the point of all the “I am doing X” tweets. Why tell the world what you’re up to? Let me tell you a story. Names of people and products have been omitted or disguised but the details are essentially true. Some of you might recognise yourselves, though!

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I was just about to write a blog about feeding Twitter into Evernote via the Twitter RSS feeds and an RSS-to-email service when I discovered I had written about it years ago. What I missed out of the blog, though, was the URLs for the RSS feeds. So here they are.

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These days I keep all of my notes in Evernote. In fact, not just notes, but anything I think I might want to refer to later. Web pages, product brochures and manuals, scanned articles from magazines. Pretty much anything. All are suitably tagged to help find them, and all are available on all my laptops, via the web, and on my iPhone. Evernote is brilliant.

Something I set up a little while ago now is a feed from Twitter into Evernote. Twitter provides RSS feeds for various of your twitter pages. I take the feeds for my updates, my mentions and my favourites and feed them into Evernote. Evernote doesn’t (yet) have a facility to import RSS feeds directly, but it does give you an email address that turns emails into notes. I use feedmyinbox.com to turn the Twitter RSS feeds into emails to my Evernote email address. This gives me an archive of everything tweet I’ve ever sent, every tweet mentioning me, and every tweet I’ve favourited. It would be nice if Evernote supported this directly, but until then this does work quite well. The emails from feedmyinbox.com produce somewhat messy notes, but at least the content is there.

I’ve had this set up for a few months now and not really used it until this afternoon. I remembered something I’d said to somebody on Twitter but couldn’t remember who. A quick search via my iPhone and I found the tweet from back in July and so found who I’d sent it to.

I’m not sure how often I’ll find this useful, but Twitter doesn’t make it very easy to search through your old tweets directly so I’m happy knowing I have a way of doing it.

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